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Our Yoga

What is Yoga?

Yoga is a group of physical, mental, and spiritual practices or disciplines which originated in ancient India. Yoga is one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophical traditions.

The origins of yoga have been speculated to date back to pre-Vedic Indian traditions; it is mentioned in the Rigveda, but most likely developed around the sixth and fifth centuries BCE, in ancient India's ascetic and śramaṇa movements.

Yoga gurus from India introduced yoga to the West, following the success of Swami Vivekananda in the late 19th and early 20th century with his adaptation of yoga tradition, excluding asanas. In the 1980s, a very different form of modern yoga, with an increasing number of asanas and few other practices, became popular as a system of exercise across the Western world. Yoga in Indian traditions, however, is more than physical exercise; it has a meditative and spiritual core.

Group of people in sportswear practicing yoga indoors
Group of people in sportswear practicing yoga indoors

Liquid Yoga

Each on of us is a unique individual. We are all of differing physiologies, ages, personalities and tastes. We work and live in differing environments. Therefore our needs can vary significantly.

We believe yoga needs recognise this and adapt to the individual. So the yoga we practice and teach at Yoga Nectar seeks to be flexible and fluid. We call it Liquid Yoga.

So on joining our classes we look to get to know you and understand your needs. We provide alternatives where postures seem too challenging for the physiology and experience of the student. We discourage a rigid approach to yoga practice. We encourage our students to respect their own bodies and not attempt postures causing pain or injury or exacerbate an illness or condition.

Yoga Nidra

Yoga Nidra is a state in which the body is completely relaxed, and the practitioner becomes systematically and increasingly aware of the inner world by following a set of verbal instructions. This state of consciousness is different from meditation in which concentration on a single focus is required.

In Yoga Nidra the practitioner remains in a state of light withdrawal of the five senses (pratyahara) with four senses internalised, that is, withdrawn, and only hearing still connects to any instructions given.

It is among the deepest possible states of relaxation while still maintaining full consciousness.

The regular practice of Yoga Nidra has been found to reduce tension and anxiety. Practices usually last 20-30 minutes.

See Perry's article in our blog.

Group of people in sportswear practicing yoga indoors

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